View SAPRP grants by type:

View SAPRP grants by:
Topic
,
Date or Investigator r

 

Assessment of the Impact of the New Safe and Drug Free Schools and Communities Act

Principal Investigator: Denise Hallfors, Ph.D. , Senior Research Scientist
Publications Type: Journal Article
Author(s): Hallfors D., Godette D.
Article Title: Principles of effectiveness improve prevention practice? Early findings from a diffusion study
Journal: Health Education Research
Volume/Issue/Pages: 17, 4: 461-470
Year: 2002
Abstract:
This study examines adoption and implementation of the US Department of Education's new policy, the 'Principles of Effectiveness', from a diffusion of innovations theoretical framework. In this report, we evaluate adoption in relation to Principle 3: the requirement to select research-based programs. Results from a sample of 104 school districts in 12 states indicate that many districts appear to be selecting research-based curricula, but that the quality of implementation is low. Only 19% of the responding district coordinators indicated that schools were implementing a research-based curriculum with fidelity. Common problems included lack of teacher training, lack of requisite materials, use of some but not all of the required lessons and teaching strategies, and failure to deliver lessons to age-appropriate student groups. This study represents the first attempt to assess the quality of implementation of research-based programs as required by the Principles of Effectiveness. We conclude that low levels of funding, inadequate infrastructure, decentralized decision making and lack of program guidance have contributed to the slow progress in improving school-based prevention
Publications Type: Journal Article
Author(s): Pankratz M., Hallfors D., Cho H.
Article Title: Measuring perceptions of innovation adoption: The diffusion of a federal drug prevention policy
Journal: Health Education Research
Volume/Issue/Pages: 17, 3: 315-326
Year: 2002
Abstract:
The purpose of this paper is to describe the testing of a new scale to assess the perceived attributes of a federal drug prevention policy. The 17-item scale was administered to 107 Safe and Drug Free Schools (SDFS) coordinators in 12 states as a part of a larger investigation examining the diffusion of a federal drug prevention policy. In developing this scale, the authors drew from theory, previously validated measures, expert review and pre-testing with SDFS coordinators. Factor analysis revealed three underlying constructs representing relative advantage/compatibility, complexity and observability. The constructs found were internally consistent with a Cronbach's alpha ranging from a high of 0.89 for relative advantage/compatibility to a low of 0.71 for observability. Each of these constructs was correlated with a district's adoption of the policy in predictable ways. The construct of relative advantage/compatibility appears to be especially useful in assessing policy adoption. This scale was developed to assess a specific innovation; however, we believe that it can be easily adapted to understand the adoption of other health education interventions.
Publications Type: Journal Article
Author(s): Hallfors D.
Article Title: Federal Policy Seeks to Reduce the Gap Between Substance Abuse Research and Practice
Journal: Connection
Volume/Issue/Pages: , June: 3
Year: 2003
Abstract:
No abstract available.
Publications Type: Journal Article
Author(s): Hallfors D., Van Dorn R.A.
Article Title: Strengthening the role of two key instutitions in the prevention of adolescent substance abuse
Journal: Journal of Adolescent Health
Volume/Issue/Pages: 30, 1: 17-28
Year: 2002
Abstract:
No abstract available.
Publications Type: Journal Article
Author(s): Hallfors D., Iritani B.
Article Title: Local and state School-based Substance Use Surveys:Availability, Content and Quality
Journal: Evaluation Review
Volume/Issue/Pages: 26, 4: 418-437
Year: 2002
Abstract:
School-based substance use surveys are an important data source for prevention and evaluation researchers, but access to students has become progressively restricted by schools. Because almost all states and many districts conduct their own regular surveys, archived data are a potential resource for informed policy and practice decisions. In this study, substance use survey data were successfully collected from 69 of 105 targeted school districts located in 12 states. Results indicate the availability and quality of extant data currently limit their usefulness. Recommendations are made regarding how schools could be assisted to improve the value of their substance use surveys.

 
   
 
 
     
   
  About SAPRP  | SAPRP Staff | Questions | P: 336.286.4548 | F: 336.286.4550 

SAPRP . One Leadership Place . Greensboro, NC 27410 . saprp@ccl.org